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DHA(Docosahexaenoic Acid)and EPA(Eicosapentaenoic Acid)belong to Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. They are essential long chain unsaturated fatty acids for human beings. While human can’t generate these two acids in our body, we need to obtain them from daily foods or supplements. Deep sea fishes such as tuna, anchovy, sardine etc. contain large quantities of DHA and EPA in their body.
DHA is vital in maintaining normal physiological functions of our CNS system, and directly related to the etiology of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases(e.g. Alzheimer's disease, major depression, etc.)if their levels are found to be significantly lower. DHA is of very high concentration in our brain cell membrane and retina, therefore if an infant is not getting sufficient supply of it may have the risk of either neurotic or sight development.
EPA is called as “vessel sweeper”. It plays roles in cleaning up blood vessels, therefore preventing the onset of cardiovascular diseases and heart diseases.
During normal cell turnover or the clean-up of damaged cellular tissues, cell membrane with rich DHA/EPA components is catalytically converted by enzymes to bioactive metabolites like Resolving and Protections, which play roles in resolution of chronic inflammation - the etiology to the onset of a variety of chronic diseases.
The American Heart Association (AHA) recommended 0.5 to 1g of omega-3 EPA and DHA for individuals with borderline fasting triglyceride levels (150 to 199mg/dL), 1 to 2g for individuals with high fasting-triglyceride levels (200 to 499mg/dL), and 2 to 4g for individuals with very high fasting-triglyceride levels (>500mg/dL). AHA also recommended normal healthy individuals consume a variety of deep sea fish and a daily intake of 1g of omega-3 EPA and DHA for patients with documented coronary heart disease (CHD).